Ful

South Sudan food
Ful is most associated with Egypt and Sudan, which consider it their national dish. This dish is composed of boiled fava beans and oil on which we can add tomatoes, onions and cheese. Salt, chilli and lemon are served as table condiments.

Mabele meal

Swaziland food
Sorghum meal is known as “Mabele” in Swaziland. It is one of a traditional South African staple food. You will usually find it served with a tomato relish or a chili vegetable relish called “chakalaka”.

Sweet potato

Swaziland food
Sweet potatoes has traditionally been one of the main staples of the Swadi diet. Sweet potatoes are a great source of protein, vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium.

Oji, Tuwo oji, or Dawa

Niger Food
In Nigeria Tuwo is a generic term for solid/swallow foods in Hausa language. Oji(millet) and Dawa(guinea-corn) is a porridge made by soaking and pounding the grain.

Shinkafa

Niger Food
Shinkafa is the most popular Hausa Nigerien/Nigerian food as it is eaten everywhere. It is basically thick and solid rice pudding. It goes well with stew of meat and vegetables.

Couscous

Niger Food
Couscous is a staple food in either Sahels and Saharas region. To eat Couscous in traditional way, pull off a small ball of mush with your fingers, form an indentation with your thumb and use it to scoop up tasty stews and other dishes.

Masala

Niger Food
Masala is a thick porridge made of maize meal. Here I post Masala with Miya (Nigerien tomato sauce) and Gombo (Okra sauce).

Macchiato

ethiopia food
The original native population of coffee is thought to have come from East Africa specifically to Ethiopia. And due to the Italian influence, Macchiatos are also now a mainstay. It is a double or triple shot of Espresso with a dollop of milk foam on top. Add sugar if you wish.

Spreece

ethiopia food
Ethiopian layered fruit drink, locally called “Spreece”, is what I wasn’t expecting. People of Ethiopia make a beautiful layer of mango, avocado, guava, papaya and other ingredients.

AMBO

ethiopia food
Ambo is an Ethiopian brand of mineral water which contains rich carbon dioxide and originates from a spring in the town of Ambo. In Ethiopia, it is often used to prepare fancier mixed beer –“beer-tail”.

Maragi

DR Congo food
Palm oil is important local oil used for cooking and frying. In certain stews, it is the preferred oil for preparing it. Magagi (also Maharage) is the correct word for “black beans” that is one of the most common food in DR Congo prepared in such a way.

Sambusa

Tanzania food
A crispy thin dumpling encases a spicy mix of mashed potato and grind meat, which is then folded into triangle shape then deep-fried. It’s a fantastic light meal.

Matumbo

Kenya food
Matumbo is very hearty stew with a mixture of organs such as intestines and stomachs. It is usually combined with tomato-based soup.

Boroso

Lesotho food
The centerpiece is Boroso, a traditional South African sausage made from minced meat, fat and spices and herbs. Its origin refers to stem from the days of the early farming settlers in South Africa.

Melange

Rwanda food
As for food, the staple Rwandan diet is beans, rice, bananas and fast food favourites such as fried meatballs and goat stew. Meaning of the word “Melange” is derived from “mélanger” in French (“mix” in English). It is served as combo (assorted) platter while Agatogo is a hotchpotch.

Accara

Gambia food
Accara is common street food which is crispy black-eyed-bean fritter(s). It is similar to the Accara elsewhere in West Africa, and has much in common with Tamaya in Egypt and Farafel in Syria.

Tapuca

Ivory Coast food
Tapuca is a hot and sugary drink that usually contains little balls of starch of tapioca and condensed milk.

Karkade (كركديه)

South Sudan food
Karkade (كركديه), Western Africans refer to this as Bissap, is red roselle(hibiscus) blossoms produce a delightfully refreshing tea because it contains organic acids, including citric acid. It is prepared by boiling dried sepals of the flower then adding sugar.

Foutou banani, Sauce arachide

Ivory Coast food
“Foutou” (pronunciation is like “foot”) is a dish popular in Akan countries including Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire. It comes in the form of a ball made ​​from dense cassava, plantain or yam and is eaten with a sauce on the side. Here I post “Foutou banani” (pounded yam and plantain) and “Sauce arachide” (peanut stew).

Foutou banani, Sauce gombo

Ivory Coast food
“Foutou” (pronunciation is like “foot”) is a dish popular in Akan countries including Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire. It comes in the form of a ball made ​​from dense cassava, plantain or yam and is eaten with a sauce on the side. Here I post “Foutou banani” (pounded yam and plantain) and “Sauce gombo” (ladyfinger stew). Ladyfinger is chopped and it makes the soup a bit “slimy” and viscous.